John Fetterman claims that the stroke he had "changes everything" in his life.

 John Fetterman claims that the stroke he had "changes everything" in his life.

John Fetterman claims that the stroke he had "changes everything" in his life.

The stroke John Fetterman sustained in May "changes everything" about his life, the Democratic candidate for Pennsylvania's US Senate seat who has had his health ridiculed by his Republican rival, Mehmet Oz, revealed.


He insisted that his disability was only temporary and that Dr. Oz would continue to be a fraud in January in a televised interview with NBC. He used a closed captioning machine to read the questions that were asked of him.

His remarks are the most recent development in a contest that is becoming more competitive and may determine who controls the Senate.


The campaign has been characterized by animosity between Fetterman and his rival, a star television doctor whose career brought accusations of quack medicine for reportedly bogus diet pills and dubious Covid treatments. Earlier this month, Fetterman focused on claims that Oz had mistreated animals while working as a researcher at Columbia University.


In the NBC interview, Fetterman had trouble identifying certain words and having trouble pronouncing others. He acknowledged that the stroke had negatively impacted his ability to process sound and speak, which he purposefully emphasized after first trying to pronounce the term "empathetic" correctly and mispronouncing it as "emphetic."

His comments are the most recent step in an increasingly contested race that might determine who will lead the Senate.


Acrimony between Fetterman and his challenger, a well-known television physician who has been accused of practicing quack medicine for allegedly fake diet pills and dubious Covid treatments, has marked the campaign. Fetterman concentrated on allegations that Oz mistreated animals while working as a researcher at Columbia University earlier this month.


In the NBC interview, Fetterman struggled to recognize certain terms and pronounce others. He tried to pronounce the word "empathetic" correctly, but mispronounced it as "emphetic," then he recognized that the stroke had adversely affected his ability to interpret sound and speak.

I occasionally have trouble understanding what I hear. So that I can see what you're saying, I use captions.


And occasionally I'll omit a word. Or I might occasionally combine two words. But as long as there is captioning, I can make out what is being asked.

That is an illustration, he said. "Prior to the stroke, I always believed I was sympathetic. I now have a better understanding of the daily struggles faced by Americans.


Fetterman responded, "It changes everything," when interviewer Dasha Burns inquired about how the stroke affected his own day-to-day existence. Its entire environment has transformed.



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